School of English 

Popular Literature

Lunchtime Lectures

Wednesdays 12.30-1.30pm in Hilary Term

Neill Lecture Theatre, Trinity Long Room Hub

FREE OF CHARGE – ALL WELCOME

2018 SCHEDULE:

Popular Literature Lunchtime Series

Do you love Lord of the Rings? Potty about Harry Potter? The Popular Literature Lunchtime Lecture Series, hosted by the School of English at Trinity College Dublin, is a series of free public lectures from Irish and international experts on all sorts of popular literature – romance, crime, horror, children’s literature, and more.

Running on Wednesdays from 12:30 – 13:30pm in Trinity’s Hilary Term (Jan-April) this monthly series takes the form of 30-40 minute lectures followed by a 10 minute open Q&A in which the audience will be invited to offer comments or questions on the topic.

The series is aimed at postgraduate students, staff, and the general public. Perfect for a lunchtime pop lit fix!

25 January 2018 | “Wands, Words & Wizard Wheezes: 20 Years of Harry Potter” presented Dr Jane Carroll of the School of English, TCD. Read more here 

14 February 2018 | “Fifty Shades of Grey” By Dr Dara Downey UCD. Read more here 

28 March 2018 | “The American Amazon: Wonder Woman in the 1940s” by Dr Keira Williams  Queens University Belfast.  Read more here 

2017 SCHEDULE

1 Feb. YA author Moïra Fowley-Doyle talks YA fiction and popular literature with Dr Jane Carroll (TCD)

8 Feb. Dr Andrew Pepper (Queen’s University Belfast): “Crime Fiction (and The Wire) in the Era of Ferguson and Black Lives Matter.”

15 Feb. Professor Nick Daly (University College Dublin): “Swashbuckling in Ruritania: The Prisoner of Zenda and Other Stories.”

22 Feb. Dr Gerard Hynes (Trinity College Dublin): Another world is possible? : worldbuilding in popular culture.”

6 March (MONDAY at 12.30pm) . Dr Christopher Pittard (University of Portsmouth): “Unparalleled Necromancy: Dickens and Performance Magic.”

22 March. Dr Bernice M. Murphy (Trinity College Dublin): “‘We Will Have a Happy Marriage If It Kills Him’: Gillian Flynn and the Rise of Domestic Noir.”

 

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